Panasonic Life Innovation Container

So that I don’t seem like I am getting too “oh my god, the CEO/Nerd has feelings!”, a photo that caught my eye today:

Mobile solar station....

This is a mobile solar station that was being set up next to a temporary office building to provide power in Earthquake/Tsunami stricken Japan. I found it terribly interesting and intriguing considering the line of work my company is in. So I did a little digging and found out that this is the Panasonic Life Innovation Container

(photos from AP and Panasonic)

I love it! One of the things I am constantly looking into with PITT Consulting is when we do respond or offer solutions in Emergency Situations that we can do so in a way that also tries to answer the green needs of the planet. As is being dramatically demonstrated by recent events in Japan, when responding to an emergency, one has to be totally self-sufficient as that oftentimes, telecommunications as well power is knocked out. Communications are paramount during a disaster and telecom cannot run without power. In comes solutions such as these- power without having to tap into the grid, with the added benefit of being earth friendly.

Now mind you- a solar solution will not always work as that it is of course dependent on there actually being sun but it does help expand the mind about what COULD be done. Good job!

This entry was posted on Friday, April 1st, 2011 at 10:26 am and is filed under Emergency Management, Mobility/Wireless, Technology. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

One Response to “Panasonic Life Innovation Container”

colin April 2nd, 2011 at 11:42 am

Damn I blinked and you started typing. Love the solar container I’ve been around shipping containers since living in the UK in the 80’s.
There is more being done with them. Homes built with containers are getting more spectacular there is more potential. Disaster aid, Indonesia, Haiti and Japan. You load a container ship with 10,000 containers you deliver product and a town for 20,000+ people with relatively little work effort on site.

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